The Nano India Blog

The official blog of Nano India magazine

Rebranding the same old science!

Old Wine in a New Bottle?

What is nanoscience? Is it different from nanotechnology? Is it chemistry? Many chemists do think that nanoscience is another word for molecular chemistry. However, there are many who would argue with that definition (including the physicists, mechanical engineers, chemical engineers, bioengineers working in nanotechnology). Is molecular physics also nanoscience?

Though my own effort to understand nano science and technology over the last couple of years (as a journalist) and more so, after deciding to start the magazine, from last six months, has been that it is the same old science that Democritus, Rutherford, Rustom Roy, Milburn, etc have been talking about.

Hence I have been toying on the idea whether to ask this question or not… but after seeing the response that people have showered upon us for the blog, I assume I will get the answer!!!!

Best part that nano has brought in is that the youngsters think it is the most happening science and they are ready to show keen interest in this rather than “boring” chemistry and physics. By facing this happening tag to our good old science we are able to attract more kids to seriously take up nanotechnology!

What difference does the name make? Do kids seek out nano-related activities over more traditionally named activities? Or is this just rebranding of the same old science or is it something new? Can we make nanoscience something different?

If anyone has better way to explain nanotechnology please let me know. It would be of great help to understand….

K Jayadev

Filed under: books, Chemistry, electronics, events, history, magazines, nanotechnology, Physics, Sciences, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Call for Editorial Contributions

Hello Everybody,

 

There has been a huge flow of inquiries from all quarters to find out how they could write articles or send their research papers for consideration of publication in the print version. Let me thank all of you for your keen interest to be part of our magazine.

 

First thing is we are launching the magazine in the last week of March. So the wait for the print version is almost getting over.

 

To have your articles published in the magazine , kindly note the below points:

 

1. The article should be original, unpublished elsewhere.

2. Before proceeding with the article, please inform about the topic in a two or three lines brief to the editor. Based on the confirmation you can proceed with the article.

3. Basically the magazine will not be a journal and we want article with less technical jargon, so you will have to write in that fashion only.

4. Length of the article should not be more than 1,500 words. Less the merrier, mind you we are working on Nano!

5. You can write a series of Nano (small) articles, but you will to have discuss about the same in advance and proceed with the series.

 

To have your research papers (abstracts) published in the magazine:

 

  1. The paper should be authored by the person/persons who have sent it. We need some kind of proof about the same, if they are students.
  2. All references and other acknowledgements have to be properly mentioned at the end of the paper.
  3. All the papers sent for publication will be scrutinized by a panel, and then will be sent for publication.
  4. If the panel recommends for more information, the authors should be in a position to provide the same at the earliest.
  5. If the panel rejects the paper, the same will be informed to the author/s about it through email.
  6. All the supporting documents, graphics, photos, should be sent in proper JPEG, TIFF formats to the below given address.

 

To have exclusive Photos or Artworks or Graphics that have been arrived at, during the research, to be published in the magazine, kindly note that we have an exclusive section (page) called NanoScapes which is dedicated to these. You can send these materials for publication with description and details of the photo or artwork or graphic.

 

To have profiles of Institues or Research centres or Organisations to be published in the magazine, kindly send the details of the same with supporting photos and contact information. If the editorial staff wants to contact the institute/centre/organization, please provide with correct names and addresses so that we could collect more information.

 

The magazine will have exclusive section devoted to education and career segments in the field of Nano Science and Technology. The section would be called as NanoPrimer. In this section, every issue, we will feature an educational institute talking about the courses, eligibility, facilities, faculty, etc (with photos). Those interested to spread the word about their educational institute kindly get in touch with the Editor for the same.

 

This apart, NanoPrimer will have specialized section which will give a complete view about the various opportunities that are available for Nano Scientists – from Research Fellowships to Job Opportunity in the industry. Those who want to reach larger, captive people in the field of Nano Science and Technology, they can get in touch with the magazine for sending across their message to people.

 

There has been also enquiries from few companies who have products that are used in and by Nano Science field, to feature about their products. The magazine would be more than willing to have details of the latest products that are available in the market, their specifications, usage, etc. We request the companies to send in their information to the Editor with proper images and complete details.

 

Please note: Unsolicited material would not be entertained.

Please be specific on what section you are addressing and what you want to contribute to the magazine.

All the rejected articles and papers/abstracts will not be returned.

 

The deadline for submitting your articles and other editorial material is March 1 .

 

Best

K Jayadev

Editor

 

Address for communication:

 

Typical Creatives

#416D, Fourth Floor,

Babu Khan Estate,

Basheerbagh,

Hyderabad – 500029

Ph: 040-23235414

Email: nanoindiamag@gmail.com

Filed under: books, electronics, events, history, nanotechnology, Sciences, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Stanford writes in world’s smallest letters

Storing information in electron waves

The researchers encoded the letters “S” and “U” (as in Stanford University) within the interference patterns formed by quantum electron waves on the surface of a sliver of copper. The wave patterns even project a tiny hologram of the data, which can be viewed with a powerful microscope.

“We miniaturized their size so drastically that we ended up with the smallest writing in history,” said Hari Manoharan, the assistant professor of physics who directed the work of physics graduate student Chris Moon and other researchers.

The quest for small writing has played a role in the development of nanotechnology for 50 years, beginning decades before “nano” became a household word. During a now-legendary talk in 1959, the remarkable physicist Richard Feynman argued that there were no physical barriers preventing machines and circuitry from being shrunk drastically. He called his talk “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom.”

Feynman offered a $1,000 prize for anyone who could find a way to rewrite a page from an ordinary book in text 25,000 times smaller than the usual size (a scale at which the entire contents of the Encyclopedia Britannica would fit on the head of a pin). He held onto his money until 1985, when he mailed a check to Stanford grad student Tom Newman, who, working with electrical engineering Professor Fabian Pease, used electron beam lithography to engrave the opening page of Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities in such small print that it could be read only with an electron microscope.

That record held until 1990, when researchers at a certain computer company famously spelled out the letters IBM by arranging 35 individual xenon atoms.

Now, in a paper published online in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, the Stanford researchers describe how they have created letters 40 times smaller than the original prize-winning effort and more than four times smaller than the IBM initials. (www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3QQJEHuefQ)

Working in a vibration-proof basement lab in the Varian Physics Building, Manoharan and Moon began their writing project with a scanning tunneling microscope, a device that not only sees objects at a very small scale but also can be used to move around individual atoms. The Stanford team used it to drag single carbon monoxide molecules into a desired pattern on a copper chip the size of a fingernail.

On the two-dimensional surface of the copper, electrons zip around, behaving as both particles and waves, bouncing off the carbon monoxide molecules the way ripples in a shallow pond might interact with stones placed in the water.

The ever-moving waves interact with the molecules and with each other to form standing “interference patterns” that vary with the placement of the molecules.

By altering the arrangement of the molecules, the researchers can create different waveforms, effectively encoding information for later retrieval. To encode and read out the data at unprecedented density, the scientists have devised a new technology, Electronic Quantum Holography.

In a traditional hologram, laser light is shined on a two-dimensional image and a ghostly 3-D object appears. In the new holography, the two-dimensional “molecular holograms” are illuminated not by laser light but by the electrons that are already in the copper in great abundance. The resulting “electronic object” can be read with the scanning tunneling microscope.

Several images can be stored in the same hologram, each created at a different electron wavelength. The researchers read them separately, like stacked pages of a book. The experience, Moon said, is roughly analogous to an optical hologram that shows one object when illuminated with red light and a different object in green light.

For Manoharan, the true significance of the work lies in storing more information in less space. “How densely can you encode information on a computer chip? The assumption has been that basically the ultimate limit is when one atom represents one bit, and then there’s no more room—in other words, that it’s impossible to scale down below the level of atoms.

“But in this experiment we’ve stored some 35 bits per electron to encode each letter. And we write the letters so small that the bits that comprise them are subatomic in size. So one bit per atom is no longer the limit for information density. There’s a grand new horizon below that, in the subatomic regime. Indeed, there’s even more room at the bottom than we ever imagined.”

In addition to Moon and Manoharan, authors of the Nature Nanotechnology paper, “Quantum Holographic Encoding in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas,” are graduate students Laila Mattos, physics; Brian Foster, electrical engineering; and Gabriel Zeltzer, applied physics.

The research was supported by the Department of Energy through SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES), the Office of Naval Research, the National Science Foundation and the Stanford-IBM Center for Probing the Nanoscale.

For more information: http://news.stanford.edu

Contacts:
Dan Stober
dstober@stanford.edu
650-721-6965

Copyright © Stanford University

Filed under: books, electronics, events, history, nanotechnology, Sciences, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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